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of them palestinians. palestinian militants have continued firing weapons into israel. in cairo, discussions are ongoing about cease-fire. jeremy our coverage from gaza. >> good morning, gaza. this was the wake-up call sent in by israel. growing up in gaza is not easy. not far away, is the rubble left by the israeli strike on sunday that killed 10 members of this family including four children and two neighbors. they are looking for the remains of a teenage girl missing and presumed dead. this man is a relative of the dead. >> sad, may be strong. >> street are getting tougher, more solid. when they tell the parents of a boy, he will grow up for revenge. >> during the last of years, the conflict has been overshadowed by dramatic changes elsewhere in the middle east. the differences between the two sides got sharper. what makes this crisis difficult and dangerous is it is happening in a region more unstable than at any time since the 1950's. hamas released videos of rocket launches. the events of the last few weeks have silenced those who said they had forgotten how to fight israe
>>> this is "bbc world news america." taking to the fight to the heart of israel. set to receive britain's backing, syriana's new opposition leaders have talks in london. and the unmistakable sound of led zeppelin. we talked to jimmy page about their special honor in the u.s. >>> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. we begin with dramatic developments in the middle east. palestinian militants have fired a rocket all the way to jerusalem for the first time in decades. they have also targeted tel aviv. israel has risen but by calling up reserve troops and stepping up its bombardment of gaza. in a moment, a report from the gaza strip were there more civilian casualties today. first, we have this report from tel aviv. >> today, and the heart of israel, sirens scream for people to take cover from rocket fire. the past 24 hours have come as quite a shock. even for the million israelis living close to gaza, fear is part of their daily lives, the mortar and rocket fire have increased dramatically. one young couple went out to look at the rocket dam
-fire between israel and hamas, bringing an end to eight days of fighting. the will it last? >> the people of this region deserve to live fear -- fogh -- to live free from fear and violence. this is a step in the right direction. >> and his sound has made him a superstar in italy. now this musician is out to make his mark. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. just a few hours ago, a cease- fire to end the fighting between israeli military forces and hamas militants. it came after hours of diplomacy involving the u.n. secretary general and the secretary general -- and the u.s. secretary of state. from gaza, jeremy bowen reports. a warning, you might find some of these images distressing. >> because i came back to life after the cease-fire began. -- gaza came back to life after the cease-fire began. coming to another israeli bombing campaign felt like another victory. this was the hamas interior ministry. governing with or without a cease-fire will be harder with the main administrative center ron. in jerusalem tonight, is real hint that more military
-fire, it is not doing what many want it to do which is break with israel, instead what it is trying to do is broker a cease-fire in which it brings this conflict, this conflict to an end, and which it preserves the peace treaty with israel because there is a profound need on the part of the egyptian government to deal with their monumental economic problems. >> rose: and then we turn to a new documentary filmed cause the central park 5, made by ken burns, his daughter sarah burns, and also joined by raymond santana. >> police department and the prosecutors made huge glaring errors, not entertaining alternate narratives, making huge mistakes in procedures. >> little kids should not be under that kind of interrogation, that is outrageous, that they missed the actual rapist several times and couldn't get him and i think people have made reputations prosecutors is made reputations on this and they can't abide by the notion that they could say, you know, i am sorry, put a period at the end of this thing. >> rose: how many apologies have y received? >> none. >> rose: none? >> none. well from the media an
? >> now bbc world news america. israel kills the leader of hamas in the of the, causing an escalation of violence. governments should stop cutting benefits and start creating jobs. welcome to manhattan, kansas. >> may know more about technology than a tomcat's knows about baking gingerbread. >> welcome to our viewers. israel killed the military commander of hamas and launched a series of attacks. hamas vowed in this would open the gates to hell. military action will continue. >> for the people of gaza, it looked like a war, and as in most wars, civilians are caught up in the violence. the first target today was the biggest hamas's most senior military leader was typify and -- hit by a military strike. he died instantly. hamas says this is a major provocation. good >> they will pay a price for this, because he was one of our most exceptional leaders. >> she sat at the top of the military wing. tonight israel published these images. the army released video footage of him being tracked and the moment when his car was hit. israel said the strike followed a wave of rocket att
. less than a week after the end of fighting between cost and israel, egyptian mediators have started talks with both sides to work on details of the ceasefire. with discussions underway, a hamas has been for the first time allowed to control the border area between israel and gaza to control the violence. our correspondent is there. >> there is a high chance we would have been killed if we had tried to come here just a couple of weeks back. but the cease-fire means israel has lifted the buffer zone it had inside got up for years. now we and how moscow and go right to the border and sand -- now we, and how moscow, can go right to the border and stand. >> it is amazing that they can't stand so close to the border with the israeli army just -- can stand so close to the border with the israeli army just on the other side. but that is one of the reasons they have called a victory for them. >> it is certainly good for the palestinians that have farmland under the watchful eye of the israelis. suleyman has not been able to farm his land close to the border because of the israeli restriction
, clearly israel will have to let go some of its black cade of gaza. >> rose: also, david ignatius of the "washington post" from washington. >> on the larger question here of whether the obama administration before the election had an interest in minimizing the public's understanding that al qaeda still posed a threat, a different threat from the one that we were used to with bin laden but a threat nonetheless, i think the answer increasingly yes s yes. they didn't want the public to see that effort as anything other than a great success. that was part of obama's appeal. so i'd say on the particular details, i don't see much. on the broad theme, did they want the public to feel al qaeda was down for the count? yes, i think they did. >> rose: we conclude with julian sands, a british actor, talking about harold pinter, the english playwright and nobel laureate. >> in comparison with harold, other people looked blurred because he was such a life force. he was so present. he was so forceful. and he lived by pure intention. >> rose: aluf, david ignatius and julian sands when we continue
>> this is "bbcworld news america." tensions flare in the middle east as israel and palestinian militants exchanged rocket fire. bp pays a record fine and plead guilty to criminal charges. more than two years after a massive oil spill at daily inched the u.s. coast. --deluged the u.s. coast. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there are real concerns that the conflict between palestinian militants in gaza and israel could spark a wider conflict in the region. air raid fire sounded in the israeli city of tel aviv as rockets were fired towards it. the assaults underlines the rising tension. >> tonight, sirens sounding across tel aviv. the commercial capital and most populous city now a target for the rockets being fired by militants -- militants in gaza. people to cover bread they could. there were no casualties -- people took cover where they could. there were no casualties. >> i saw a flash of light. 2 kilometers in the direction of the seat. the rocket landed in the seat. >> targeting tel aviv marks a significant escalation of this growi
recognition that the palestinians were seeking. israel and the u.s. were opposed. it could delay hopes for achieving an independent palestinian state through peace talks. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton said the vote was unfortunate and counterproductive. >> a landmark day in and often turbulent history. jubilant palestinians to i heard there president demand what he said was their basic right to self-determination. >> the moment has arrived for the world to see clearly. enough with the settlements and occupation we are here now. >> after days of diplomacy, the majority backed palestine's bid to be recognized as a nation, but without full membership. many in a yasser arafat a square felt this was a symbolic than significant day, were the of celebration. a little -- the political activists are happy, but know that the struggle continues. >> we learned not to get our hopes up, not to get high expectations. we will wait. but we feel that we are heading in the right direction. >> israeli control over the occupied territories will not end as a result of the u.n. vote. the palestinia
the ve between hamas and israel. the egyptian president is vzleading thek&a=ñduií6whÑc.é (. he hopes there will be results. hillary clinton in jerusalem. attacks have2g0y1e continued ao cease-fire has been announced. >> in/+úw5!h&ajm) gaza, israel'y dipbrqì(lc@&c+ talked. hamas was-óz:."!qmhh8 ing, t zero.all civilians were r cover. gaza after another israeli strike. while thisçkk÷ibñ was going ons and israel claimed to be ready for a truce as long it was kind that could both present as a victory. "tw1÷in the alertsoundedojpjd,b, they s 15 seconds to+>tbl-t,wr"uxjet te shelters before an impact. the residents are skeptical about cease-fires because they have seen so many that have not worked. not far away from of the ground forces were shelling gaza. the operation has been supported by its allies so farq"o00 but ty want a cease-:vmfw bloodshed of another invasion. jerusalem forg:>rgmfvñ÷iváazlor cease-fireal [he told the prime minister[wt strongly cautioned aa ground operation/et?zrl which wd only result in further casualties. >> there has been plenty already. two bro
viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: after another day of violence, a ceasefire deal between israel and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across region to consolidate this progess, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> woodruff: a short time later this a
resistance to israel, controls gaza. after long opposing abbas's u.n. efforts, the militant hamas recently endorsed the move. >> ( translated ): the hamas movement is with all the diplomacy acts that adds to the palestinian victories. we welcome the step for statehood at the united nations but we want it to be through a national program based on the resistance and keeps the palestinian rights. >> warner: general assembly recognition would put palestine on a par with the vatican at the u.n., but would not grant full representation. last year, abbas failed to win full u.n. membership for a state of palestine. the u.s. is opposed to even limited recognition, saying it will endanger prospects for a negotiated settlement with israel. state department spokeswoman victoria nuland issued that warning again today. >> we are concerned that this vote is going to make the work of getting... the work of getting the parties back to the table more difficult. >> warner: but the palestinians' u.n. representative riyad mansour voiced the opposite view yesterday. >> it should be respected by everyone and we
, mr. obama found himself on the phone with middle east leaders as israel and hamas in gaza rained down rockets on each other. and secretary clinton headed for the region hoping to use a cease-fire to search for longer term answers. >> now we have to focus on reaching a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security, dignity, and legitimate aspirations of palestinians and israelis alike. pete: but she also made it clear the u.s. is firmly supporting its ally israel. peter baker was traveling with the president. peter, with all the changes in the region, how has the u.s. role changed in this process? >> well, of course, you saw president obama taking a very hands on role in this. something that he's been reluctant to do at times in the past. he had a bad experience trying to involve himself in peace making in the middle east in the beginning of his presidency. he grew a little disenchanted with how intransigent players were. he and netanyahu the prime minister of israel have a troublesome relationship to say the least. and yet he decided in this case he had to
militarized crossing from gaza to israel. and israel decides what crosses- - goods, people. it is a complete commercial strangehold on a place desperate to be a country. policemen able to show themselves on the streets without being targets for the first time in nine days. fighters, too, and so many people in gaza claim their ability to fire rockets into tel aviv and jerusalem has changed everything. we went north this morning, as did so many gazans, to areas they fled in recent days. up here in north gaza, close to the frontier with israel, people are used to the airstrikes that come, the craters that pockmark the countryside and that destroy their buildings. let's face, it's happened now every few years. so when you come here, you'll find a sense of relief and immediate happiness, of course, but people are pretty skeptical about whether the peace will last. >> ( translated ): god willing i hope it holds but i'm 50/50. they've been breaking their promises since the prophet's day. >> reporter: mobility scooter meets hamas flag. ahmed atah lost both legs in the last israeli invasion. so, will
rise between syria and israel. it is a fortress like no other. how did one intruder slipped past security to get his hands on the keys to the tower of london? on publice to our viewers television and around the globe. the conflict in syria has widened with israel saying it will respond with severity if any more mortars landed in the heights. this has happened twice and wise israel has responded. today with direct hits on syrian units. the violence comes at the same time as the arab league has recognized the newly formed syrian opposition bloc as legitimate. on the ground, aircraft co. continued their bombardment. >> the war is brought perilously close to the turkish border. one of the bombs brought by syrian air force jets exploded barely 10 meters from the frontier, shattering windows and the turkish side. activists had several people were killed in the bombing. government forces try to recapture the town that fell to the rebels last week. the hostilities that more refugees streaming across the border. turkish ambulances were standing by to cope. with 120,000 refugees in camps i
'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown: the president's backers insisted the decree would be in effect only until a new constitution is approved. >> ( translated ): yes, he might be a dictator for the time being or might have unprecedented power throughout this period of two months, but after that, these powers will be transferred to an elected parliament. >> brown: but tens of thousands of anti-morsi protesters rallied in tahrir square, the heart of last year's popular revolution that led to end of the regime of hosni mubarak. they threw rocks at riot police, who retaliate
that that suffering israel. and we ought to take that suffering seriously, and poverty matters. why does it take somebody having to do this much research? scientific data that convinced them. i think there is a big picture. it is really hard on kids. exactlywe don't know what is going on or why kids are growing up in poverty tend to succeed so much less, they can give their own explanations for that. i will say it is the economy. some will say neighborhood conditions, the families and schools. that is just confirming our own biases. we are often talking past each other. it just feels like people calling in, the same talking points of people being oppressed or lazy. i want to change because it should push them from that c aring. tavis: the science tell us -- what does science tell us about that? dr. the biggest impact is the biology of stress, the way that when kids grow up around stress that is chronic and intense, it gets under the skin and alaska lifetime. it affects the kind of skills that matter so much. the other set of research that is important is about connections with parents. when kids
above the cease-fire between hamas and israel, which gained international plaudits? >> they are two events that in a way bracket the decision. one is a four $0.8 million deal with the international monetary fund. in a way, we have to concede that he is borrowing a page from the book of hosni mubarak. you make yourself helpful on the international stage. you brokered deals between israel and hamas and the palestinians. and then you do what you want at home. there was a test for him abroad. he now faces a democratic test. is he a genuine democrat, does he believe in one vote, one time? >> what should the u.s. reaction be? >> i think we should make it clear that even though we are grateful for what he did in gaza, we hold him to a high democratic standard within egypt itself. >> thank you very much indeed for joining us. no deal, that was the headline from the summit on the european union's long-term budget, which today ended in failure. while some heralded the discussion as constructive, the prime minister of britain accused brussels of living in a parallel universe. gavin hewitt is a
a state established years ago, and that is israel. rather, we came to affirm the legitimacy of a state that must now achieve its independence, and this is palestine. >> sreenivasan: palestinians said the vote would strengthen their hand in future peace talks with israel. but the israeli ambassador to the u.n., ron prosor, warned that the palestinians are turning their backs on peace. >> for as long as president abbas prefers symbolism over reality, as long as he prefers to travel to new york for u.n. resolutions rather than travel to jerusalem for genuine dialogue, any hope of peace will be out of reach. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators said today they will push to cut off u.s. aid, if the palestinians use their new status to bring israel before the international criminal court. in iraq, a wave of attacks today killed at least 43 people. most of the victims were in the city of hillah, south of baghdad. back-to-back explosions targeted shi-ite pilgrims and emergency responders. the force of the blasts left twisted wreckage of cars outside shops in a busy co
to that the escalating tension between israel and hamas and the head spins, martha. >> you need a flow chart for this week. incredible that one week ago tonight we learned about david petraeus and that he resigned as c.i.a. director and today he is up on capitol hill testifying about benghazi. of course, this happened september 11 of this year, the attack in benghazi. a lot of different stories right away about why that happened, how that happened, but it was susan rice, u.n. ambassador, i think it was five days later on the sunday talk shows saying that she thought it came as a result of some protests and because of the egyptian in cairo, there were protests about this anti-muslim film. the republicans have pounced on that. you heard john mccain and lindsey graham saying there is no way they want her to be secretary of state, nominated to secretary of state. everybody knew that it was terrorism. >> everybody knew it was terrorism. well, today, one of the things that david petraeus said is that he knew right away it was terrorism. and in the talking points, they took that out because it was
and israel in the gaza strip. the announcement came after a week of rocket attacks and counter-attacks that has killed an estimated 150 people. most of the dead are palestinians. and just before that agreement to end hostilities, a bomb exploded in a tel aviv bus station injuring 27. >> tom: i don't wake up trying to solve for wall street, i wake up trying to solve for our members and customers each and every day. still ahead, we talk health care reform with florida's largest health insurer, chairman and c.e.o. of florida blue, patrick gerahty joins us. >> tom: among the taxes scheduled to go up on new year's day if there is no solution to the fiscal cliff are taxes on dividends and capital gains. 403 of the 500 companies in the s&p 500 stock index now pay investors to hold their stock. that's the highest number since 1999. these companies paid shareholders a record $34 billion in cash in august alone. the threat of higher taxes on investments has hit stocks of traditional dividend payors, such as utility stocks. the sector exchange traded fund has fallen to its lowest price ut
neil/lehrer productions >> brown: israel stepped up its military offensive in gaza today
about israel and gaza. the possibility of a deal to avoid going off the fiscal cliff? let's start with the sex. [laughter] general david petraeus had an affair with his biographer, paula broadwell, a married mother of two pit talk about unlimited access. general petraeus was set to testify as we were recording this program, so we don't know what he said yet. >> we are safer because of the work that dave petraeus has done. my main hope right now is that he and his family are able to move on, and that this ends up being a single side note on what has otherwise been an extraordinary career. >> ordinary career. david petraeus is a highly decorated -- extraordinary career. david petraeus is a highly decorated general with a ph.d. from princeton university. roger, you have been around for awhile. how does a smart man like that get into a mess like this? >> like he said, let's get to the sex. he is america's spymaster, aside from the degrees and all that. but he decides to conduct an affair through a gmail account, because gosh, nobody can get access to that except maybe any 12-year-old
they got there or might have done it. amid a media circus, israel to mock -- denies what it calls a ludicrous palestinian clans. palestinian officials were determined to prove -- preserve some dignity as his tomb was resealed. results of the test will not been known for several months. >> the term ponzi scheme has become all too familiar. this time is not bernie madoff. afghanistan's largest financial institution was used to steal hundreds of millions of dollars. a copy says that almost $900 million in loans were made just 219 people and companies. the fact was revealed when regulators seized the bank. it comes as an embarrassment to president karzai whose brother is one of the main beneficiaries. >> afghanistan has seen so much money and it went into the hands of the tiniest number of people. to the relief, this moneychanger included the bank, survived. in fact, this was an international -- for the first time, a deal could -- a detailed explanation of what happened. i spoke by television to president karzai's brother. he is accused of taking millions but denies the charges. >> th
morsi's role in the cease-fire between israel and hamas. concern was growing about more trouble in cairo tomorrow. this afternoon, the muzz lum brotherhood spokesman said the party had postponed demonstrations tuesday to avoid bloodshed. >> brown: a short while ago i spoke with nancy youssef. nan nancy youssef, let's begin with the latest statements from president morsi's spokesman. it's hard to know whether the president is backing off or simply clarifying the pronouncements he made late last week. how is it being red in cairo? >> >> reporter: that's exactly how it feels here after several days of protests, and tents in tahrir square, the scene that led to the overthrough of the previous regime. a spokesman came out saying he would have the final say over all sovereign matters. what constitutes a sovereign matter remains unclear. it seems they could be as broad or as specific as morsi wants. and under that agreement, he has ultimate say oaf those matters, and there's nobody who can overrule his decision. and that could apply to thingses like the commit they will draft the perm
administered by the agents of israel. >> the time has come to maybe try to find the proof of what has happened and to bring justice. i think he deserves and the palestinian people deserve it. >> reporter: to palestinians he was the ultimate fighter for freedom. to israelis, the face of terror. they cornered him first in lebanon and then to his west bankhead quarters. allowed at last into exile he died officially from a stroke. but traces of highly toxic polonium were recently found on his clothes. the israeli secret services finally get their man. >> did israel murder, assassinate, get rid of yasser arafat. >> i can tell you a definite absolute no. they used to say that we, that our snipers had arafat on their sights and the decision was not to kill him. >> reporter: whatever dark secret this grave might or might not reveal, the timing is fortuitous. in the very week that palestinians applied to the united nations for recognition. a significant step towards the fulfillment of yasser arafat's life work. after arafat's death, experts warned after so many years definitive answers are likely to re
. there was word today that israel has approved construction of 3,000 new homes in jewish settlements on the west bank. the associated press reported the development one day after the u.n. general assembly recognized palestine as a non-member observer state, including gaza, the west bank and east jerusalem. the palestinians quickly condemned any new settlement building. chief negotiator saeb erekat accused israel of "defying the whole international community." in syria, internet access and most phone service was blocked for a second day. opposition activists blamed the regime. government officials insisted rebels were behind the outage. meanwhile, fighting continued in and around damascus, but government troops managed to reopen the road to the city's airport. the u.s. soldier accused of espionage in the wikileaks document dump has conceded he considered suicide after his arrest. private first class bradley manning was cross-examined today in a pre-trial hearing at fort meade, maryland. he admitted making a noose out of bed sheets before being sent to the u.s. marine corps brig at quantico, virgi
and israel in the gaza strip holds, many think prices at the pump will drift lower. it also helps that u.s. refineries are producing ample supplies of gasoline. a.a.a. expects regular unleaded to end the year between $3.10 and $3.30 a gallon. but longer term, the price of gasoline depends on the strength of the global economy. >> my outlook right now for gasoline prices is, we are going to continue to come off some more? the thing with gasoline, you can't shove it down people's throats. they just don't have the money for higher oil prices. hence, that's going to put a cap on it. >> reporter: with only about a month left, 2012 is expected to be the most expensive year for gasoline ever. americans are expected to spend about $12 billion more to fill up their tanks this year compared to last. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: what determines gas prices? as erika just reported, there's more to it than supply and demand. to learn more about prices at the pump, visit our web site, www.nbr.com, and look for the "nbr-u" tab. >> tom: while gas prices remain over $3 a gallon, the auto in
countries, turkey, iraq jor on and lebanon. even israel will not be completely safe from it in syria. >> what would cause outside sources to say we're no longer going to take a hands-off attitude and take a hands on attitude by getting involved engaged on the ground. >> i hope we don't get there because military intervention is at best, at very best a very, very risky thing. you don't want them, you don't want intervention a la afghan strap, or libia. and i think, i really think you don't need that. because in the present circumstances will you have that outside of security council because are you to the going to have a resolution that will allow military intervention. that's out of the question for the moment. so you have to do it from outside. if you do it from outside you'll have a lot of opposition to it from day one. and it is look, libya is 6 million people. they had no army practically. and you see the amount of destruction that has taken place. you see how long it took and you see the results. so people a lot of people in syria, i think why not lib yament and they are warnedd
. >>the situation with iran in israel, if conflicts continue to arise between them, how is that going to affect our country and our relationship with the middle east? >> sreenivasan: expectations for immigration reform. >> i believe students or citizens or anybody in the community who has strifed to get a college education should have a bath way to become a legal citizen. >> sreenivasan: a number of students voice for their desire for more options at the voting booth. >> i think the tea party system isn't doing us much more good anymore. we need to open it up and allow space for other options. >> sreenivasan: despite their concerns, almost all the young voters interviewed said they were hopeful about the future. >> the hum... the human race is always trying to look for ways to understand each other. we are not in the worst situation that we've ever had before. the future should be better even if it's more difficult, it should be better. >> sreenivasan: others were more cautiously optimistic. >> i'm hopeful about the future but not in a traditional sense. i'm not hopeful in politicians
evidence of that. of the despite? >> of the dispute? >> ifill: well, richard murdoch. >> israel, rished murdoch became almost the third rail of local politics. even though what he said, you know, was consistent with-- it was-- and not indefensible. there appeared to be a callous, almost disregard for the terrible experience of being raped, let alone a pregnancy coming out of that rape. >> you talk about the gender issue. it's always important to distinguish between married women and single women. >> that's right. >> married women were very strongly for republicans, single women very strongly for democrats. the sociological trend over the past 20 years is there are a lot more single people, men and women. so the numbers just get bigger as the country goes into what they call living solo. >> woodruff: and it calls to mind the strategy that obama very transparently employed, talking about planned parenthood, talking about the position of the republicans on-- not just on abortion but on contraception, and there was a lot of criticism-- has been a lot of criticism-- >> i've heard criticism f
. >> brown: there was no let-up today in the battle between israel and hamas, the palestinian group that rules gaza. air strikes echoed across gaza, and rockets landed near tel aviv and, for the first time, near jerusalem. the combined death toll reached 30-- 27 palestinians and three israelis. we begin with a report from john ray of independent television news in gaza. >> reporter: a sleepless night in gaza gave way to another morning of missiles. israel promised a lull in their assault, a chance for words to speak louder than bombs. but on neither side was there a cease-fire. and if the egyptian prime minster came armed with a peace plan, he kept it to himself. this was far more a display of muslim brotherhood with hamas. hesham qandeel called gaza a tragedy, and israel the aggressor. the tragedy is deeply personal, and it unfolds at the gaza city hospital where they rush the dead and the injured. boys like yea, just ten years old. "i was buying bread for my mother," he says, "when the rocket came." dooah, a girl of 14, was hit my shrapnel on her way to a wedding. "all i remember
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: israel and the militant group hamas slid closer to all-out war today. the israelis blasted gaza with scores of air strikes, and the palestinians said 16 people were killed there. hamas and its allies fired more than 200 rockets and even struck as far away as tel aviv. three israelis were killed. we begin with this report by john ray of "independent television news." ( gunfire ) >> reporter: in gaza, gunfire and a thirst for revenge. thousands throng the streets for the funeral of a hamas leader killed by israel. the first death of this conflict but how many more will follow? the mood here is of great anger and defiance. militarily, hamas is no match for the israeli air force. but they say this ia death that must and will be avenged. so, no ceasefire in sight, just a ceasel >> this is nbr.
>> woodruff: israel aimed a new wave of deadly airstrikes at gaza today, and hamas fighters sent a volley of rockets into southern israel, six days after the escalation began. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have reports from gaza city and tel aviv, and talk with journalist nancy youssef in cairo, where diplomatic efforts to broker peace are under way. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the other hot conflict in the middle east, in syria. margaret warner takes us inside the opposition forces and examines turkey's efforts to help the rebels. >> gist around this corner down this cobblestone street is a back alley where you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're
of air strikes and rockets between israel and hamas. rumors of a cease-fire flew all day, and secretary of state clinton arrived in the region after nightfall. >> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening. i'm susie gharib. federal reserve chairman ben
. >> brown: israel and the militant group hamas slid closer to all-out war today. the israelis blasted gaza with scores of air strikes, and the palestinians said 16 people were killed there. hamas and its allies fired more than 200 rockets and even struck as far away as tel aviv. three israelis were killed. we begin with this report by john ray of "independent television news." ( gunfire ) >> reporter: in gaza, gunfire and a thirst for revenge. >> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america."
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